Tag Archives: tea cozy

Ghost Post

Or “The Post Who Walks”

I’ve been doing a lot of crochet of late.  I don’t know why it is.

I can go for ages without picking up a hook and I think I’ve given it up, but then, for no reason, I get haunted by ideas for woolen items and my fingers itch for my crochet hooks and my over-abundant stash of yarn.

Here’s one of the latest creations my itchy fingers made.  It’s more than a little daft, which I think is why I like it so much.

Phantom Tea Cosy

I made it for my cousin Joey Ramone. (actually, he’s Mr Knightley’s cousin, but, along with all his good ballpoint pens, I like to claim my husband’s extended family as my own).  If you are Facebook friends with my blog, you might know Joey as a regular and supportive commenter (only he calls himself ‘Adam’) for both my and Matilda’s posts.  In fact, Joey has been very supportive of our homeschooling efforts all year, and it was his birthday and I wanted to say thank you.

Joey Ramone is a big fan of The Phantom.  I’m pretty sure he has a tattoo of Lee Falk’s most famous character on his arm (or leg?  I can’t remember…).  Plus he loves a cup of tea, so a Ghost Who Walks tea cosy seemed the obvious choice.  But, strangely enough, I couldn’t find a pattern for such a creation.

Phantom Tea Cosy

When I searched for “The Phantom”, I got a lot of hits for “The Phantom of the Opera”, so I searched for “The Phantom the Ghost Who Walks Crochet”.  Google asked, “Did you mean “The Phantom The Ghost Who Walks crotch?“, which I thought was highly disturbing.  No, Google.  No I didn’t.  You are sick, Google.

In the end, I designed my own pattern (oh, yes, I totally did).  It took me a while to understand that Kit Walker’s head is more of a rounded rectangle than an oval or a circle, and then everything else fell into place.  I had a go at drawing my design onto graph paper, and then hooked it in rows following my little pattern.  I made a basic cover for the teapot, finishing it with a button from Nan’s stash and then sewed the motif on.  I wanted to stitch “The Ghost Who Walks” on the reverse side, but it looked lame, so I left it blank.

Graph paper pattern

Joey Ramone was really happy with his birthday present and I was really happy with his reaction (I might have hopped around and clapped my hands a bit.)

If anybody would like a go at making a Phantom motif (I can assure you, it exists nowhere else on the internet!), drop me a line in the comments.  If enough people are interested, I’ll draw up a tutorial and post it in my “Hooky Business” section.

It would be really cool if The Phantom had a famous catchphrase that I could sign off with here, but I don’t think he does.  “See you in the Skull Cave!”? “Old jungle saying: tea cosy keep tea hot!”?  Nope.

Bye, then.

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Pippi and Lovely M’s Granny Square Tea Cosy

Free Crochet Pattern (C) Laptop on the Ironing Board 2013

tea cosy

This tea cosy pattern is designed for those sleek looking teapots that don’t really have much of a spout, but pour out of the top.  I’m sure the pattern could be modified to suit other types of teapot, but for now, we’ll stick to this kind.

You have permission to sell the finished products from this pattern but re-writing, re-selling, distributing, or copying this pattern itself is prohibited.

This is my first ever crochet tutorial.  I hope you’ll be patient with me and let me know of any errors.

another angle of the lovely cosy

I made these cosies with DK acrylic yarn (mine were Kmart brand) and a 4.5mm hook.  You will also need a button and a needle and thread to sew it on.

button detail

Here are the stitches used in this pattern.  I have used UK terms throughout:

Chain – “ch”
Slip Stich – “slst”
Double Crochet – “dc” (US sc)
Treble Crochet – “tr” (US dc)
Double Crochet Decrease – “dc2tog”
Treble Crochet Decrease – “tr2tog”

I had planned to give you a little description of each (you know “yarn over, insert hook, pull through a loop” and all that malarkey), but I think it would be better for both of us if you typed any stitch you’re unsure of into YouTube and watch one of the many excellent stitch tutorials available there.

Now, let’s get started!

Chain 4 in loop

To begin, ch 4 and slip stitch into beginning chain stitch to make a loop.

chain 3 - counts as first tr

Now ch 3 – this counts as your first treble stitch

2 tr into loop

Now work 2 tr into the loop you made at the start

work 3 more shells into loop and join

Now *(ch 3 and work 3 tr into loop).  Repeat from * two more times.  You should have 4 “shells” in your loop.  Ch 3 and attach to the top of your first 3 ch with a slst.  Fasten off and change colour.

Attach new colour with sl st in corner space

Now, attach your new colour with a sl st in one of the corner spaces (doesn’t matter which one) and ch 3.  This counts as your first tr.

work 2 shells into corner space

Work 2 more tr into the same corner space, then ch 3 and work 3 tr into the same corner space.

first granny square

Next, * (ch 1 and move on to the next corner space.  Work 3 tr, 3 ch, 3 tr into this space) repeat from * 2 more times, then ch 1 and join with a sl st to your original ch 3.  Fasten off.

Take a moment to admire your first completed granny square.  You will need to make enough of these to make a little belt for your teapot.  I needed six.  Also, because I can’t stand sewing squares together, I used the joining-as-you-go method, which I learnt from the lovely Lucy at Attic24.  Here’s a rundown:

joining as you go

Work the first two corners as before, then work your first 3-treble shell into the third corner.  This is the point when you would usually work a 3 ch space, but because this is the side you want to join, work 1 ch and then 2 slip stitches into the corner of the square you’ve already made.

joining as you go

Next, work your 3 tr shell as usual.  Then, instead of working a ch 1 space, work a sl st into the corresponding side space of the square you want to join.

joining as you go

Now work your 3 tr shell into the next corner and, instead of your usual 3 ch space, work 2 slip stitches into the corner space of the square you want to join and 1 ch.   Then work your next 3 tr shell and complete the square as usual.

two joined squares

Heave a small, happy sigh and admire your handiwork.

six joined squares

Continue in this way until you have enough squares to wrap around your teapot (if you were to make this for a traditional teapot, you would need two strips, which together are long enough to wrap the teapot.  In the next step, you would need to make 2 bridges to join both together)

joined thread

Join your next colour to your granny strip on one of the long edges, but not at the corner.  Dc in each stitch/space to the end.

little bridge

Now it’s time to make a little bridge.  Ch 3

little bridge

And bring the other end of your granny strip around and make a slip stitch into the first corner.  You’re making a little belt for your teapot.

dc around

Now continue to dc around until you get back to the start.  Join with a sl st to your original ch 1.

treble round

Now for a round of decreasing trebles.  Ch 2, *(2 tr, tr2tog) around, then join with sl st to ch 2.

decreasing doubles

And now some decreasing doubles.  Ch 1, then (2 dc, dc2tog) around.  Join with a sl st.

final round

Finish off with a round of double crochet.  Ch 1, then dc around.  Join with a sl st and fasten off.

Working the other side

Now flip your work upside down.  We are going to work into the other long side of your granny strip (as an aside, anyone who reached this page by googling “granny strip” needs to sit down and reflect on the direction their life is taking).  Attach your yarn with a slip stitch into one of the end corners.

working the underside of the tea cosy

You will be working in rows from corner to corner in a similar way to the rounds you just did.

Row 1: ch 1, dc in every stitch/space Row 2: ch 2, ( tr in next 2 st, tr2tog) repeat to end Row 3: ch 1, (dc in next 2 st, dc2tog) repeat to end

dc all around

Now do a row of dc.  When you get to the end, work 3 dc into the corner stitch.  Do not turn.  Continue working dcs up the side of your granny strip, around, and down the other side.  When you get to the end of the second granny square edge (about 2 cms from the end of the row), you’ll be at around the right place to work a button-hole loop.  The size of this will depend on the size of your button, but I will say ch 8 and join with a sl st to the same stitch.

Completed cosy

Then continue on your way, working dcs until you reach the other corner.  Join with a sl st and fasten off.  Dance a quiet jig (just a wiggle in your chair will suffice).

decisions, decisions!

Next comes the exhilarating task of choosing a button and the less-than-exhilarating task of sewing it on (you want the cosy to button up snugly under the teapot handle).

teapots with cosies

And you’re all done!  Just what you need to bring a snug, homespun touch to your (or your lucky friend’s) kitchen!

teapot

Like this pattern?  Think it needs some adjusting?  Please leave me a comment and share this pattern with your friends – they might end up making one for you!

A Real True Proper Crafty Blog

tea cosy

Oh, I’m so excited!  I just posted my first ever crochet tutorial on my blog!  I know a lot of my lovely readers aren’t excited by crochet, but please indulge me on this one.  It makes me feel like my little blog is all grown up and being productive.

another angle of the lovely cosy

This original pattern is called Pippi and Lovely M’s Granny Square Tea Cosy, copyright 2003, Laptop on the Ironing Board, Inc.

button detail

I might also post the tutorial as a blog post after this.  I hope you don’t mind.  It’s just that I can’t work out how to tag it when it’s in page form, and I want all the people out there searching for a free tea cosy pattern to be able to find this one!

teapot

While I was at it, I also updated my About page, which was in dire need of some tinkering.

For those of my wonderful readers who tune in to hear stories of my children misbehaving, take heart!  The more I faff about with crochet tutorials, the more mischief my children achieve, so it’s win-win.

Now, if you’ll excuse me, I must encourage Christopher Robin to stop watering the washing…

The Joy of Giving

I just had to share:

teapots with cosies

I made these tea cosies for my two dear friends, Pippi and Lovely M.  You might remember Pippi as my friend who made the soap for my blog candy giveaway.  She gave it as a gift for the blog and wouldn’t accept any payment for it.  If your memory is really good, you might remember Lovely M from my socially awkward misadventures in Label Fail – the Sequel.  I wanted to give M a new name as everyone else in the blog seems to be named after some literary character (or Brady Bunch member).  In some ways, M is like Little Friend Susan to my Milly Molly Mandy.  But Little Friend Susan is sensible and hardly talks, and that doesn’t describe M at all.  Anyway, Lovely M is happy to be called Lovely M and I think it rather suits her.

In a world of self-contained school mothers with blow-waved bobs and glacial conversational skills, Pippi and Lovely M provide an oasis of genuine friendship and spray-coffee-through-your-nose laughter.  That, in itself, I think, is enough to warrant a present, but as it happens, both Pippi and Lovely M have recently moved house (from near by to even nearer by!), which means I get to make them housewarming presents (my favourite kind!).

When Pippi and Lovely M received their presents, they made all the right exclaiming noises to ensure plenty more handmade gifts come their way.  In a strange way, I love that something I made will live in their home.  Does that make sense or is it vaguely stalker-ish of me?

Anyway, here’s the most exciting part:

The pattern is my own design!

I’ve never designed my own crochet pattern before, unless you count my star snowflake, which is really more of a modification than an original design.  I think I will call it Pippi and Lovely M’s Granny Square Tea Cosy.   When I get organised, I will put a tutorial (with rather dodgy photos) in the “Hooky Business” section of the blog.  Just like a real grown-up craft blog!  And I can put it on Ravelry and everything!

I’ve also just finished a blanket for my brand-new nephew.  I struggled a little with this one, but we got there in the end (meanwhile my nephew is six weeks old):

blanket

I wanted to sew a cloud motif on in the corner, but with the variegated yarn it just looked weird, so I left it off.

And finally:

parcel

This parcel is bound for Tennessee, for Sandy from Craftsnotherstuff, the winner of my birthday blog candy giveaway.  I’m thinking of sneaking in some Tim Tams (choc biscuits) and other Aussie treats, but I’m still working out how to do it without getting chocolate over everything…

Oh!  It’s all so exciting!  Giving gifts is even more fun when I can boast about it all over the internet…